Tuesday, June 17 – Rain in Yellowstone

We drove into the park on Friday, May 30 and were soon greeted by impressive mounds of snow. The park had received about 150% of its normal annual snowfall and it showed. Everywhere we went we saw snow either in greater amounts than normal or in places not seen before. Where the snow had melted we found “pools” of water of varying sizes in places where we are accustomed to dry land. And green! We found green foliage where we were accustomed to brown. The lake still had a fair amount of ice in places and watching and listening to it break up was fascinating.

IMG_20140530_132156_974

Snow drifts on the main road between Norris and Canyon

 

Ice breaks up in Mary Bay on Yellowstone Lake

Ice breaks up in Mary Bay on Yellowstone Lake

8 foot high snow drift near Sylvan Lake

8 foot high snow drift near Sylvan Lake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The park looked like an 8 week old puppy, all full of energy and promise.

We spent the weekend setting up our home. This is one of the cool things about camping. Where we needed help from others in areas such as setting up our satellite dish, we were able to offer assistance to others in areas where we had skills.

On Tuesday, June 3 we officially processed into the park with our new employer (same employer as last year but now it’s this year so it’s new). Wednesday we started work, getting our annual safety, first aid, fire and assorted other trainings and on Thursday we started getting the boat ready for the season.

In the past, by the time we’d been in the park for a few days, we’d had at least one snowfall. But this year that has not been the case. It has rained. A lot. On Thursday, June 12 we did our shakedown trips where we take company employees out for our normal tours, giving us an opportunity to fine tune our narrations. It snowed, rained, and sleeted all day. The weekend of June 14 has seen more rain than I think we’ve had in full seasons here, forcing the cancellation of outdoor activities.

In the past, by the time we’d been in the park for a few days, we’d had a least one power outage. But this year that has not been the case. Well… it hadn’t. That all changed on Friday after we’d been in place for 2 weeks. When the winds come up, the power goes down and we began having our first windy days late last week. If a tree falls in the forest and no one hears it, it makes no difference. The tree fell because of the wind and the power will still go down. For anyone familiar with the butterfly effect, this is the manifestation of it. If a butterfly farts nearby, we’re going to lose power. In the past if power went out on the weekend we had to wait about 4 hours for the generator technician to drive into the park and fire up the generator. Now it appears the generator is instant on. Which is nice except it is also instant off. It seems to take about 4 or 5 restarts for the generator to get going and provide reliable power. Meanwhile the microwave beeps with each restart, the TV blinks on and off and I cringe to think about everything else in the trailer that uses electricity.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.